Welcome to Off Campus Writers Workshop (OCWW), the longest continuously running writing program in the country. 

~ Dedicated to providing members with the inspiration, education and collegial support to achieve their writing and publishing goals ~

Established in 1946, OCWW continues to serve writers of all genres from its metropolitan Chicago home. Each Thursday morning between September and May, OCWW speakers address writers on topics ranging from craft to publishing options to the business of writing. 

As of January 2022, select sessions are being presented in a hybrid onsite-remote format, with the understanding that live sessions might be changed to a remote-only format as fluctuating conditions dictate.

Many of our speakers offer professional manuscript critiques for a reasonable fee. Achieve your individual writing goals while enjoying the camaraderie of fellow writers. Join us.

More questions? Email us

Become a Member

Membership to OCWW is just $40 per year. While you do not need to be a member to attend season programs, OCWW membership offers outstanding privileges. 

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Become a Speaker

OCWW speakers offer programs and workshops on a wide variety of topics related to writing of all kinds, from craft to markets to publishing. Contact us if you are an expert and would like to present at OCWW. 

Upcoming events

    • February 03, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. 

    “The catalogue of forms is endless: until every shape has found its city, new cities will continue to be born. When the forms exhaust their variety and come part, the end of cities begin.” Italo Calvino 

    The structure of a work of fiction is the reality through which everything else moves. Without it, stories can flounder, lose shape, or dissipate into the ether! In this two-hour seminar, Michael Zapata (The Lost Book of Adana Moreauwill guide writers through what it means to navigate the reality inventing power of structure. We’ll discuss experimental and non-traditional narrative structures found throughout the world and how to structure and map out our own work. The seminar will also include an opportunity for a Q&A!

    Michael Zapata is a founding editor of MAKE Literary Magazine and the author of the novel The Lost Book of Adana Moreau, winner of the 2020 Chicago Review of Books Award for Fiction, finalist for the 2020 Heartland Booksellers Award in Fiction, and a Best Book of the Year for NPR, the A.V. Club, Los Angeles Public Library, and BookPage, among others. He is the recipient of an Illinois Arts Council Award for Fiction and the City of Chicago DCASE Individual Artist Program Award. He is on the core faculty of StoryStudio Chicago and the MFA faculty of Northwestern University. As a public-school educator, he taught literature and writing in high schools servicing drop out students. He currently lives in Chicago with his family.

    Michael will accept the first 2 manuscripts to be submitted and paid for to critique. 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • February 10, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. 

    The first draft of any short story is largely explorative: finding out what the story will be by writing it. But what happens next? Once you have created a first draft, necessarily flawed, how do you revise it into a polished, powerful story? Many writers are daunted by this task, and many stories falter at the threshold of the second, or third, or final draft. In this class, we will treat revision as a series of steps, rather than a single, sweeping transformation. We will break break stories down into their component parts and talk about how to use each aspect of fiction to greatest effect: setting, pacing, tension, character, dialogue, and more.

    Abby Geni is the author of the novels The Wildlands and The Lightkeepers, as well as a short story collection, The Last Animal. Her books have been translated into seven languages and have won the Barnes & Noble Discover Award and the Chicago Review of Books Awards, among other honors. Her latest novel, The Wildlands, was named one of the best books of 2018 by Kirkus and Buzzfeed and was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize. Geni is a faculty member at StoryStudio Chicago and recently served as Visiting  Associate Professor of Fiction at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop.    

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • February 17, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Remote
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite.

    As special as your writing project is to you, it will fight for attention with all the other manuscripts that pile up in the inboxes of publishing professionals. That's why those first twenty pages matter so much. In this workshop, we'll look at the key elements that can make your manuscript stand out, and signal that the rest of your novel is packed with promise and punch. 

    Christina Clancy's debut novel, The Second Home, was released June 2, by St. Martin's Press. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, in The Sun Magazine, and elsewhere. She has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and lives in Madison, Wisconsin. Her second novel, Shoulder Season, was published summer 2021. 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • February 17, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 49
    Register

    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    As special as your writing project is to you, it will fight for attention with all the other manuscripts that pile up in the inboxes of publishing professionals. That's why those first twenty pages matter so much. In this workshop, we'll look at the key elements that can make your manuscript stand out, and signal that the rest of your novel is packed with promise and punch. 

    Christina Clancy's debut novel, The Second Home, was released June 2, by St. Martin's Press. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, in The Sun Magazine, and elsewhere. She has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and lives in Madison, Wisconsin. Her second novel, Shoulder Season, was published summer 2021. 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • February 24, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Remote
    Register

    Special Zoom Only Session

    Across the centuries, poets have looked to other art forms forinspiration. Using poems inspired by visual art and other media, including music and film, this workshop will examine the various ways that writers make use of other artists' work toward some purpose of their own. What new doors open when you engage with another artist’s work? How can a single image suggest a more developed narrative? How can we adapt characters from other works toward our own aims, whether through dramatic monologues or in other contexts? What are some particular strategies that allow writers to move beyond mere description of another artist's work into crafting poetry or prose that reflects their own singular vision? We’ll zoom in on the structures and strategies you can use and try out prompts that provide a path to new writing of your own. 

    Jane Satterfield is the recipient of awards in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Maryland Arts Council, Bellingham Review, Ledbury Poetry Festival, Mslexia, and more. Her books of poetry are Her Familiars, Assignation at Vanishing Point (Elixir Press Poetry Award), Shepherdess with an Automatic, and Apocalypse Mix, winner of the 2016 Autumn House Poetry Prize. Her book Daughters of Empire: A Memoir of a Year in Britain and Beyond features selections that received the Florida Review Editors’ Prize and the Faulkner Society/Pirate’s Alley Essay Award. Recent nonfiction appears in Ascent, Entropy, Hotel Amerika, and DIAGRAM. She is also co-editor (with Laurie Kruk) of the multi-genre anthology Borderlands and Crossroads: Writing the Motherland (Demeter Press). New poems may be found in Ecotone, Hopkins Review, Missouri ReviewOrion, and elsewhere. For more, visit https://janesatterfield.org.

    Ned Balbo ’s newest books are The Cylburn Touch-Me-Nots (New Criterion Poetry Prize) and 3 Nights of the Perseids (Richard Wilbur Award), both published in 2019. His previous books are Upcycling PaumanokLives of the Sleepers (Ernest Sandeen Prize), Galileo’s Banquet (Towson University Prize) and The Trials of Edgar Poe and Other Poems (Poets’ Prize and the Donald Justice Prize). He has received a National Endowment for the Arts translation fellowship and three Maryland Arts Council awards. In July 2021 he was a Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. New poems appear in American Journal of Poetry, The CommonGingko Prize 2019 Ecopoetry AnthologyNotre Dame Review, and elsewhere, and his electoral song cycle National Disgrace (credited to “ned’s demos”) is available online at Bandcamp. For more, visit https://nedbalbo.com. 

    We offer free membership to students and $5 session rates. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 03, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Remote
    Register


    Special Zoom Only Session

    Hermit crabs evolved to live inside the discarded, scavenged shells of other creatures; as the crustaceans grow, they switch between shells, looking for the right size and shape to armor their fragile bodies. The relevance to writing?  “Hermit crab” is the most common name for stories or essays that borrow the “shells” of ordinary, everyday documents like job applications, surveys, instruction manuals, recipes, school essays, and more. A story in the shape of a restaurant review or a police report can be hilarious or harrowing or anything in between. Using shells in our writing offers the writer a powerful blend of structure, inspiration, surprise, and built-in tension, as fiction presses against the conventions of traditionally nonfictional, formulaic documents. We’ll explore how writing within such constraints can shape a difficult subject or refresh a familiar one, for both writer and reader. Session will include sample readings, discussion, and creative exercises.

    Caitlin Horrocks is author of the story collections Life Among the Terranauts and This is Not Your City, both New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice titles, and the novel The Vexations, named one of the 10 best books of 2019 by the Wall Street Journal. Her stories and essays appear in The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories, The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories, The Pushcart Prize, The Paris Review, Tin HouseOne Story, and other journals and anthologies. Former fiction editor of the Kenyon Review, she teaches at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

     \

    Jennifer Egan (photo credit Pieter M Van Hattem) is the author of several novels and a short story collection.  Her most recent novel, Manhattan Beach, a New York Times bestseller, was awarded the 2018 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction, and was chosen as New York City’s One Book One New York read.  Her previous novel, A Visit From the Goon Squad, won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Los Angeles 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 10, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite

    “Literature does its best to maintain that its concern is with the mind,” wrote Virginia Woolf in 1926. “On the contrary, the very opposite is true. All day, all night, the body intervenes.” This workshop examines how memory lives in the body, using our own stories and experiences as a contribution to a wider cultural and political dialogue that centers human beings. Pulling from both literary and oral storytelling traditions, we'll engage in a series of activities that will take our writing out of the head and into the body, generating new work and digging deeper into material you're already exploring. All levels and genres are welcome; we need you. We need your voice. We're trying to remake the world.

    Megan Stielstra is the author of three collections: Everyone Remain Calm, Once I Was Cool, and The Wrong Way to Save Your Life, winner of the 2017 Book of the Year Award from the Chicago Review of Books. Her work appears in Best American Essays, New York Times, Chicago Tribune, The Believer, Poets & Writers, Tin House, and elsewhere. A longtime company member with 2nd Story, she has told stories for National Public Radio, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and theatres, festivals, and classrooms across the country. She teaches creative nonfiction at Northwestern University and weird, wonderful Zoom spaces in your living room.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 10, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 78
    Register

    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    “Literature does its best to maintain that its concern is with the mind,” wrote Virginia Woolf in 1926. “On the contrary, the very opposite is true. All day, all night, the body intervenes.” This workshop examines how memory lives in the body, using our own stories and experiences as a contribution to a wider cultural and political dialogue that centers human beings. Pulling from both literary and oral storytelling traditions, we'll engage in a series of activities that will take our writing out of the head and into the body, generating new work and digging deeper into material you're already exploring. All levels and genres are welcome; we need you. We need your voice. We're trying to remake the world.

    Megan Stielstra is the author of three collections: Everyone Remain Calm, Once I Was Cool, and The Wrong Way to Save Your Life, winner of the 2017 Book of the Year Award from the Chicago Review of Books. Her work appears in Best American Essays, New York Times, Chicago Tribune, The Believer, Poets & Writers, Tin House, and elsewhere. A longtime company member with 2nd Story, she has told stories for National Public Radio, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and theatres, festivals, and classrooms across the country. She teaches creative nonfiction at Northwestern University and weird, wonderful Zoom spaces in your living room.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 

    • March 17, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 78
    Register

    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    In this process-centered session, we will consider the best practices for writing dialogue in fiction and memoir. Through close reading, we'll look at several successful examples in published work to see what tips and tricks we can take away. The following topics will guide our discussion: who speaks and why; direct, indirect, and summarized speech; what is said and not said; formatting options for writers.

    Finally, writers will work on a piece of their own to practice incorporating various elements of dialogue. Please bring to class a few pages of a recent piece, either fiction or non-fiction. If you don't have one, that's fine. Please also bring something to write with, as we'll go through some in-class exercises.

    Emily Gray Tedrowe is a Chicago-based author of three novels, most recently The Talented Miss Farwell (Custom House). Her book

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 17, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite

    In this process-centered session, we will consider the best practices for writing dialogue in fiction and memoir. Through close reading, we'll look at several successful examples in published work to see what tips and tricks we can take away. The following topics will guide our discussion: who speaks and why; direct, indirect, and summarized speech; what is said and not said; formatting options for writers.

    Finally, writers will work on a piece of their own to practice incorporating various elements of dialogue. Please bring to class a few pages of a recent piece, either fiction or non-fiction. If you don't have one, that's fine. Please also bring something to write with, as we'll go through some in-class exercises.

    Emily Gray Tedrowe is a Chicago-based author of three novels, most recently The Talented Miss Farwell (Custom House). Her book

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 24, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite

    Obviously, lasting impressions are left by images and scenes that capture our attention and stay with us—for better or for worse. In this craft session, we will examine how writers carefully pick and choose images that carry with them emotional undertows and emotionally resonant details that speak to a larger scene, narrative, or experience of feeling. Oftentimes, our attention to image is oversimplified into adjective + noun constructions and an impulse to simply list objects within the writer or speaker’s purview. In this course, we will look at how those individual objects can be placed in context to the overall narrative structure of our poems and stories to build interior emotional states, narrative texture and rhythm. We will look at the overall strategies and choices that go into crafting successful images that make our writing more creative and complex.

    John McCarthy is the author of Scared Violent like Horses (Milkweed Editions, 2019), which won the Jake Adam York Prize. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in 32 Poems, Alaska Quarterly Review, Best New Poets, Copper Nickel, Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review, Pleiades, and TriQuarterly. He is a former recipient of The Pinch Literary Award in Poetry, and he received his MFA from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. John currently lives in Evanston, Illinois where he is an Associate Editor at RHINO magazine.

    John will accept poetry and prose for critique. Please see manuscript guidelines for details.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 24, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 79
    Register

    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    Obviously, lasting impressions are left by images and scenes that capture our attention and stay with us—for better or for worse. In this craft session, we will examine how writers carefully pick and choose images that carry with them emotional undertows and emotionally resonant details that speak to a larger scene, narrative, or experience of feeling. Oftentimes, our attention to image is oversimplified into adjective + noun constructions and an impulse to simply list objects within the writer or speaker’s purview. In this course, we will look at how those individual objects can be placed in context to the overall narrative structure of our poems and stories to build interior emotional states, narrative texture and rhythm. We will look at the overall strategies and choices that go into crafting successful images that make our writing more creative and complex.

    John McCarthy is the author of Scared Violent like Horses (Milkweed Editions, 2019), which won the Jake Adam York Prize. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in 32 Poems, Alaska Quarterly Review, Best New Poets, Copper Nickel, Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review, Pleiades, and TriQuarterly. He is a former recipient of The Pinch Literary Award in Poetry, and he received his MFA from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. John currently lives in Evanston, Illinois where he is an Associate Editor at RHINO magazine.

    John will accept poetry and prose for critique. Please see manuscript guidelines for details.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 31, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 79
    Register

    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    The physicist Carlo Rivelli asks, “Do we exist in time, or does time exist in us?” In fiction, time exists as a tool that shapes our stories. Time is our creation. We must decide which events are expanded and given priority, and which can be condensed or cast away; which moments must be thoroughly explored, and which can be summarized. Time, especially in novels, creates a rhythm that becomes the heartbeat of your book. 

    In this class, we will study time in fiction: how to speed up and slow down, when to jump into the past and when to stay present. We will explore how to write rich, inventive summary and how to craft scenes that move a story forward rather than freezing it in place. We will also talk about "seeing" time, diagramming timelines so that we can better understand the flow of time in our stories. This lecture will include handouts, readings, and ideas for take-home exercises to get you thinking about how time exists in your work. 

    Please read Edwidge Danticat’s “Without Inspection,” before class, as well as the short packet of excerpts I’ll email to registered participants. 


    Frances de Pontes Peebles is the author of the award-winning novels The Seamstress and The Air You Breathe. She is a 2020 Creative Writing Fellow in Literature from The National Endowment for the Arts. A native of Pernambuco, Brazil, she holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Her short stories have appeared in O. Henry Prize StoriesZoetrope: All-StoryMissouri ReviewIndiana Review, and Guernica.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • March 31, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 760 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite 

    The physicist Carlo Rivelli asks, “Do we exist in time, or does time exist in us?” In fiction, time exists as a tool that shapes our stories. Time is our creation. We must decide which events are expanded and given priority, and which can be condensed or cast away; which moments must be thoroughly explored, and which can be summarized. Time, especially in novels, creates a rhythm that becomes the heartbeat of your book. 

    In this class, we will study time in fiction: how to speed up and slow down, when to jump into the past and when to stay present. We will explore how to write rich, inventive summary and how to craft scenes that move a story forward rather than freezing it in place. We will also talk about "seeing" time, diagramming timelines so that we can better understand the flow of time in our stories. This lecture will include handouts, readings, and ideas for take-home exercises to get you thinking about how time exists in your work. 

    Please read Edwidge Danticat’s “Without Inspection,” before class, as well as the short packet of excerpts I’ll email to registered participants. 


    Frances de Pontes Peebles is the author of the award-winning novels The Seamstress and The Air You Breathe. She is a 2020 Creative Writing Fellow in Literature from The National Endowment for the Arts. A native of Pernambuco, Brazil, she holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Her short stories have appeared in O. Henry Prize StoriesZoetrope: All-StoryMissouri ReviewIndiana Review, and Guernica.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • April 07, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite

    Eckhartz Press co-publishers Rick Kaempfer and Dave Stern will take potential authors through the maze of the publishing world. They are hybrid-publishers, something that didn’t exist just fifteen years ago. Rick and Dave will…

    *Define the three different types of publishing (Self-publishing, hybrid publishing, traditional publishing)

    *Explore the pros and cons of each

    *Tell the story of Rick’s background and Dave’s background, and how that led them to forge this professional partnership.

    *Discuss the evolution of Eckhartz Press and what they have learned along the way.

    *Fully explain the hybrid press model they have adopted.

    Rick Kaempfer is the co-founder and publisher of Eckhartz Press in addition to being the author or co-author of Eckhartz Press releases, “Everycubever”, “Father Knows Nothing”, “Records Truly Is My Middle Name” (with John Records Landecker) and “The Living Wills” (with Brendan Sullivan). Rick had been published several times before founding the company (including a novel “$everance” and a how-to-book about radio called “The Radio Producer’s Handbook”). In addition, he was also a member of the media for more than twenty years as the producer of two Hall of Fame radio shows (Steve Dahl & Garry Meier and John Records Landecker), and still covers the industry as the media critic for the Illinois Entertainer. He has watched the media landscape change over the past thirty years from a front row seat, and is excited to use that experience as the publisher of Eckhartz Press.

    David Stern is the co-founder and publisher of Eckhartz Press, and the author of “The Balding Handbook”. After a 20+ year sales and marketing career, and a ten year stint as a principal in a Chicago advertising agency, Stern comes to Eckhartz Press uniquely qualified to tackle the realities of an ever-changing publishing landscape. He and Kaempfer have been collaborating in one form or another since they met at the University of Illinois in the early 1980s (when both must have been mere children). Stern is also one of the officers of Eckhartz Press’ parent company Just One Bad Century, Inc, and proud to call himself a life long (“City Boy”) Chicagoan.

    Rick and David will accept 1 page single spaced query letters for critique for $15 and the first ten pages of a book at $3 per page,  fiction or nonfiction. Please see manuscript section on our website, ocww.info for details

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • April 07, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 78
    Register


    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    Eckhartz Press co-publishers Rick Kaempfer and Dave Stern will take potential authors through the maze of the publishing world. They are hybrid-publishers, something that didn’t exist just fifteen years ago. Rick and Dave will…

    *Define the three different types of publishing (Self-publishing, hybrid publishing, traditional publishing)

    *Explore the pros and cons of each

    *Tell the story of Rick’s background and Dave’s background, and how that led them to forge this professional partnership.

    *Discuss the evolution of Eckhartz Press and what they have learned along the way.

    *Fully explain the hybrid press model they have adopted.

    Rick Kaempfer is the co-founder and publisher of Eckhartz Press in addition to being the author or co-author of Eckhartz Press releases, “Everycubever”, “Father Knows Nothing”, “Records Truly Is My Middle Name” (with John Records Landecker) and “The Living Wills” (with Brendan Sullivan). Rick had been published several times before founding the company (including a novel “$everance” and a how-to-book about radio called “The Radio Producer’s Handbook”). In addition, he was also a member of the media for more than twenty years as the producer of two Hall of Fame radio shows (Steve Dahl & Garry Meier and John Records Landecker), and still covers the industry as the media critic for the Illinois Entertainer. He has watched the media landscape change over the past thirty years from a front row seat, and is excited to use that experience as the publisher of Eckhartz Press.

    David Stern is the co-founder and publisher of Eckhartz Press, and the author of “The Balding Handbook”. After a 20+ year sales and marketing career, and a ten year stint as a principal in a Chicago advertising agency, Stern comes to Eckhartz Press uniquely qualified to tackle the realities of an ever-changing publishing landscape. He and Kaempfer have been collaborating in one form or another since they met at the University of Illinois in the early 1980s (when both must have been mere children). Stern is also one of the officers of Eckhartz Press’ parent company Just One Bad Century, Inc, and proud to call himself a life long (“City Boy”) Chicagoan.

    Rick and David will accept 1 page single spaced query letters for critique for $15 and the first ten pages of a book at $3 per page,  fiction or nonfiction. Please see manuscript section on our website, ocww.info for details

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • April 14, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 78
    Register

    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    Are you struggling with a particular part of your novel?  Maybe the beginning of your current draft is dragging, or the middle is slipping and falling, or the ending is simply an act of giving up.  If so, don’t fret!  Believe us, we’ve been there, too.

    In this class, we’ll walk through some practical strategies specific to the beginnings, middles, and endings of novels.  We’ll practice nitty-gritty techniques for making the opening chapters narratively propulsive and thematically rich; for intensifying or tightening the middle; and for building towards a structurally satisfying ending.   

    You’ll leave this class with immediately applicable ideas for the beginning, middle, and/or end of your novel, no matter where you are in your process.

     Joseph Scapellato is the author of the novel, The Made-Up Man(2019), and the story collection, Big Lonesome (2017). He grew up in the western suburbs of Chicago and earned his MFA in Fiction at New Mexico State University. Joseph is an assistant professor of English in the creative writing program at Bucknell University, and lives in Lewisburg, PA, with his wife, daughter, and dog.

    Joe will accept manuscripts for critique. Please see details in our manuscript section on our website, ocww.info 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 

    • April 14, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite

    Are you struggling with a particular part of your novel?  Maybe the beginning of your current draft is dragging, or the middle is slipping and falling, or the ending is simply an act of giving up.  If so, don’t fret!  Believe us, we’ve been there, too.

    In this class, we’ll walk through some practical strategies specific to the beginnings, middles, and endings of novels.  We’ll practice nitty-gritty techniques for making the opening chapters narratively propulsive and thematically rich; for intensifying or tightening the middle; and for building towards a structurally satisfying ending.   

    You’ll leave this class with immediately applicable ideas for the beginning, middle, and/or end of your novel, no matter where you are in your process.

     Joseph Scapellato is the author of the novel, The Made-Up Man(2019), and the story collection, Big Lonesome (2017). He grew up in the western suburbs of Chicago and earned his MFA in Fiction at New Mexico State University. Joseph is an assistant professor of English in the creative writing program at Bucknell University, and lives in Lewisburg, PA, with his wife, daughter, and dog.

    Joe will accept manuscripts for critique. Please see details in our manuscript section on our website, ocww.info 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • April 21, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote
    Register

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite

    "So completely has a whole year passed, with scarcely the fruits of a month. O Sorrow and Shame - I have done nothing!" So moaned Coleridge after ten years of not writing anything. Truman Capote spent the last years of his life filling blank pages with...nothing. Henry Roth managed to produce nothing in thirty years after writing the masterful Call it Sleep. Why do some writers struggle to produce a single page and others never look a writer's block in the eye? Come and learn some of the reasons for this challenge, and more importantly, some solutions. 

    Goldie Goldbloom is an Australian writer living in Chicago with her eight children. Her latest novel is On Division, which was launched on September 17, 2019 from Farrar Straus and Giroux. Her fifth book, Marguerite and Eleanor, is forthcoming in 2020, also with Farrar Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and nonfiction have received many prizes and awards, including from the National Endowment for the Arts, the City of Chicago, the Brown Foundation, Best Australian Short Stories, Le Monde and others. You can find her writing in many fine journals, including Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, Prairie Schooner and at NPR and Le Monde. Goldie teaches at the University of Chicago and in Northwestern University's MFA program for writers.

    Goldie will accept two manuscripts for critique based on order of submission and payment. 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • April 21, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Winnetka Community House 620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka, IL 60093
    • 77
    Register

    ONSITE SESSION

    Do not register for this session if you wish to attend via Zoom.

    ATTENDEES SHOULD BE PREPARED TO MASK APPROPRIATELY, OBSERVE SOCIAL DISTANCE, SUPPLY PROOF OF VACCINATION IN ADVANCE OR PRESENT IT UPON REGISTRATION.

    "So completely has a whole year passed, with scarcely the fruits of a month. O Sorrow and Shame - I have done nothing!" So moaned Coleridge after ten years of not writing anything. Truman Capote spent the last years of his life filling blank pages with...nothing. Henry Roth managed to produce nothing in thirty years after writing the masterful Call it Sleep. Why do some writers struggle to produce a single page and others never look a writer's block in the eye? Come and learn some of the reasons for this challenge, and more importantly, some solutions. 

    Goldie Goldbloom is an Australian writer living in Chicago with her eight children. Her latest novel is On Division, which was launched on September 17, 2019 from Farrar Straus and Giroux. Her fifth book, Marguerite and Eleanor, is forthcoming in 2020, also with Farrar Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and nonfiction have received many prizes and awards, including from the National Endowment for the Arts, the City of Chicago, the Brown Foundation, Best Australian Short Stories, Le Monde and others. You can find her writing in many fine journals, including Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, Prairie Schooner and at NPR and Le Monde. Goldie teaches at the University of Chicago and in Northwestern University's MFA program for writers.

    Goldie will accept two manuscripts for critique based on order of submission and payment. 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • April 28, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Remote
    Register


     Zoom Only!

     If you can't tell it in 500 words, is it worth telling at all? In this talk, we will discuss the challenge of condensing worlds of thought, emotion, and observation into tight packages of prose. We'll explore samples from masters of the form, learn some new strategies, and consider the art of concision as it applies to our own work. Writers will leave the session with a bank of examples from a diverse selection of nonfiction writers, plus a few of their own postcards to use as stand-alone pieces or seeds for a larger nonfiction project. 

    Micah Fields has published essays and photography for the Oxford AmericanGulf CoastThe BafflerColumbia Journalism ReviewSonora ReviewHayden’s Ferry ReviewWar, Literature & the Arts, and elsewhere. He holds a BA from the University of Montana and an MFA in nonfiction from the University of Iowa. He received the Oxford American’s 2018-19 Jeff Baskin Writers Fellowship, an Iowa Arts Fellowship, and the AWP Intro Journals Award in nonfiction. He served as a Marine Corps infantry rifleman from 2007 to 2011 and is a combat veteran of deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. He now lives in Helena, Montana, where he writes, teaches, and works as a fly-fishing and hunting guide. His book about Houston and its story of development and storms is forthcoming from W. W. Norton. You can learn more about Micah at his website: https://www.micahfields.com

    You can also read one of his most powerful short pieces:

    https://www.wlajournal.com/wlaarchive/26/Fields.pdf

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • May 05, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite 

    When Samuel Taylor Coleridge came up with the phrase “Prose is words in their best order and poetry is the best words in the best order,” he was chatting casually with his nephew Henry Nelson Coleridge on the evening of July 12, 1827. Yet, his remark could easily be the motto for getting a manuscript ready for submission—whatever the genre, you want every aspect to be as polished as can be, and every element to be in its most appealing sequence. Whether you’re submitting individual poems, essays, or stories to a literary journal or anthology, or whether you’re submitting a full manuscript to an agent or editor, this workshop will attend to both the quantifiable and the qualitative aspects of what makes a piece “publishable.” No matter your project, this craft talk will help you get your work ready to seek its optimal home.

    Kathleen Rooney is a founding editor of Rose Metal Press, a nonprofit publisher of literary work in hybrid genres, and a founding member of Poems While You Wait. Her most recent books include the novels Lillian Boxfish Takes a WalkThe Listening Room, and Cher Ami and Major Whittlesey. She lives in Chicago and teaches at DePaul.

    Kathleen will judge a flash contest. Please see details in the Manuscripts section of our website: ocww.info 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • May 12, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote

     Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite.

    Often, when we talk about narrative perspective, we think about the distance between the text and the reader: are we reading in first, second, or third person? What is the distance in time from story to narrator? How close or distant is the narrator from the scene? These are all questions that can be addressed from the reader’s perspective. 

    But before we can read a text, as writers, we must consider how to represent our characters’ closeness or distance through time and space: a nexus of the physical, temporal, and emotional. Does the story require immediacy, thus little to no retrospection? Or does the story need the perspective of character distance—or even historical distance? Or does the story’s needs land somewhere in between? 

    What we will find is that some of the most compelling fiction results from a consideration of characters’ bodily experience, ultimately to bring the reader as close to the palpable and atmospheric experience of the characters as possible. This is our goal as writers: to draw the reader fully within. 

    Participants should come with an example of a work in progress they would like to consider and revise. Models will include recent works by Christina Baker Kline, Rebecca Makkai, and Kirsten Valdez Quade. 

    Jennifer Solheim's stories and essays have appeared in the Bellevue Literary Review, the Los Angeles Review of BooksThe Pinch, and Poets & Writers. As a writer and literary scholar, she has taught at University of Michigan, Université de Paris VII, and University of Illinois—Chicago, in addition to creative writing workshops at the Northwestern Summer Writers’ Conference and StoryStudio Chicago. A Contributing Editor at Fiction Writers Review (https://fictionwritersreview.com/), she is also the Associate Director of the BookEnds (https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/southampton/mfa/bookends/) Novel Revision Fellowship of Southampton Arts at Stonybrook University, a program of which she is also an alum. 

    Jennifer will accept manuscripts for critique. Please see details in our manuscript section on our website, ocww.info 

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • May 19, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite.

    When we sit down to write, the first words, scenes, characters, conflicts, and settings we come up with are often the least original ones of which we're capable. Digging past the obvious, the stock (and even the products of the collective unconscious), we might finally arrive at stories that are strikingly new and memorable. In this class we'll cover some key elements of originality -- specificity, idiosyncrasy, complexity, repetition, andchange -- and talk about accessing them both in drafting and revision.

    For writing to succeed, it must be both well-executed and original. While originality might seem intuitive, or even a product of the writer's personality, it's in fact a skill that can be sharpened. That's what we'll be doing.

    Rebecca Makkai’s latest novel, The Great Believers, was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award; it was the winner of the ALA Carnegie Medal, the Stonewall Book Award, and the LA Times Book Prize; and it was one of the New York Times' Ten Best Books of 2018. Her other books are the novels The Borrower and The Hundred-Year House, and the collection Music for Wartime -- four stories from which appeared in The Best American Short Stories. Rebecca is on the MFA faculties of Sierra Nevada College and Northwestern University. She is Artistic Director of StoryStudio Chicago. Visit her at RebeccaMakkai.com or on twitter@rebeccamakkai.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



    • May 26, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
    • remote

    Remote Only. Please do not register for this session if you want to attend onsite.

    It’s widely agreed that empathy—the ability to understand and share the feelings of another—is an essential faculty of a good writer as well as a good human being. But are there incongruencies in how we commonly define and imagine empathy—in how we practice it? Is it ever unhealthy, counterproductive, even dangerous? In this talk, we’ll discuss these questions as a way to demonstrate that empathy is indeed invaluable, but that its true value might lie beyond compassion and somewhere more unexpected and ambiguous within us. And as storytellers, we’ll explore how to exercise this messier, more demanding form of empathy to help us access our most inaccessible characters and bring them to life, whether they deserve it or not.

    Vu Tran's first novel, Dragonfish, was a NY Times Notable Book and a San Francisco Chronicle Best Books of the Year. His writing has also appeared in the O. Henry Prize Stories, the Best American Mystery StoriesPloughshares, and Virginia Quarterly. He is the winner of a Whiting Writers’ Award and an NEA Fellowship, and has been a fiction fellow at Bread Loaf, Sewanee, MacDowell, and Yaddo. Born in Vietnam and raised in Oklahoma, Vu received his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and his PhD from the Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He teaches at the University of Chicago, where he is an Associate Professor of Practice in English & Creative Writing.

    We offer free student memberships at a discounted rate of $5.00 per session. You must send verification of your student status. Please contact Claudia Katz at ckatz17755@aol.com for details.

    9-9:30 Socializing 

    9:30-12 Program 



Past events

January 27, 2022 REMOTE: Audrey Niffenegger- Imaginary Friends: Building Relationships Between Fictional Characters
January 20, 2022 REMOTE: Jay Bonansinga- The Ten Habits of Highly Effective Writers
January 13, 2022 REMOTE ONLY: Mary Ruth Clarke - High Drama Scene Contest (Turn the Page Series, Session #3)
January 06, 2022 REMOTE ONLY: Ian Belknap - Prospector of the Past: Unearthing the Gold in Your Lived Experience
December 16, 2021 ONSITE - Leonard Rubin- Defaming, Ridiculing, Disparaging: How Far Can a Writer Legally Go?
December 16, 2021 Remote - Leonard Rubin- Defaming, Ridiculing, Disparaging: How Far Can a Writer Legally Go?
December 09, 2021 Alice B. Mc Ginty-The Psychological Connection: Emotional Power in Writing
December 02, 2021 Heather Sellers- The Art of Reflection
November 18, 2021 Christine Sneed- "Let's Make a Scene" (Turn the Page Session #2)
November 11, 2021 Susan Scarf Merrell-The Outline Tells You Everything
November 04, 2021 Denny S. Bryce-2021 Book Marketing: Online All-The-Time or What?
October 28, 2021 Charles Baxter-Captain Happen: Some Notes on Narrative Urgency (Turn the Page session #1)
October 21, 2021 Samantha MacLeod-Writing Sex Scenes You’ll Respect in the Morning
October 14, 2021 Taylor Byas-The Pantoum and the Sonnet
October 07, 2021 Kristin A. Oakley- Creating Unforgettable Characters
September 30, 2021 Fred Shafer- Silence in Fiction Session Four
September 23, 2021 Fred Shafer- Silence in Fiction Session Three
September 09, 2021 Fred Shafer- Silence in Fiction Session Two
September 02, 2021 Fred Shafer- Silence in Fiction $35 Four Pack Value
September 02, 2021 Fred Shafer- Silence in Fiction Session One
August 12, 2021 Thomas Tepper: Learning from "A White Heron"by Sarah Orne Jewett
July 15, 2021 Elizabeth DeSchryver- Omissions and Repetitions: Roald Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter."
June 17, 2021 Peter Hoppock:What Makes Joyce Carol Oates’ “Where Are You Going? Where Have You Been?” So Good?
June 03, 2021 Elizabeth Wetmore: Setting and Place
May 27, 2021 Rebecca Makkai - You Talkin’ to Me? The 'Ear' of the Story
May 20, 2021 Jennifer Solheim - Getting from Abstract to Concrete in Fiction (or, How to Make the Political Personal)
May 13, 2021 Zachary Martin - The Paths to Publication
May 06, 2021 Caitlin Horrocks: Confessions! With Christina Baker Kline in 2nd Half Q/A
April 29, 2021 Dean Bakopoulos - The Reason Life is So Strange: Some Thoughts on Options
April 22, 2021 Vu Tran: From Premise to Promise
April 15, 2021 Natalie Bakopoulos - The I Who Writes and the I on the Page: Strategies in First-Person Narration
April 08, 2021 Esther Hershenhorn - The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same! Writing and Publishing Children’s Books Today
April 01, 2021 Kathleen Rooney - A Flash in the Pan: Getting Started on Short-Short Fiction and Nonfiction
March 25, 2021 Rachel Swearingen - Move Me: Strategies for Getting Unstuck and Energizing Your Prose
March 11, 2021 Ian Belknap: Freshening Language
March 10, 2021 Abby Geni- The Element of Story
March 04, 2021 Kimmery Martin: Building a Writer’s Platform
February 25, 2021 John McCarthy - Mess Up Your Sentences (Correctly): Writing Imaginative, Emotive, and Engaging Syntax
February 18, 2021 Nadine Kenney Johnstone: Mining Your Memories
February 11, 2021 Chen Chen: Elegy in a Time of Pandemic
February 04, 2021 Agent-Editor Panel: Publishing from Both Sides
January 28, 2021 Mary Ruth Clarke - Back by Popular Demand: The Compelling Scene Contest
January 21, 2021 Patricia McNair: Ordinary Moments, Extraordinary Content
January 14, 2021 Libby Fischer Hellman: Building Suspense
January 07, 2021 Matthew Bird - Believe, Care, Invest
December 17, 2020 Ignatius Valentine Aloysius - Digging Deep into Revision
December 03, 2020 Brian Turner - Writing the Impossible: Navigating Love & Loss in Language
November 19, 2020 Jane Huffman: Poetry for Prose Writers
November 12, 2020 Charles Baxter: Wonderlands in Fiction
November 05, 2020 Keetje Kuipers - Outsiders Writing the Outside
October 29, 2020 Goldie Goldbloom - Conveying Emotion and Mood: The Music and Rhythm Of Sentences
October 22, 2020 Megan Stielstra - Sprung from Necessity: On Urgency and the Personal Essay
October 15, 2020 Joseph Scapellato - When What They Want Is Not Enough: Alternative Approaches to Character
October 08, 2020 Christina Clancy: Creating Characters Who Step Off the Page
October 01, 2020 Marcelo Hernandez Castillo - Poetry of Abundance: Exploring the Contemporary Long Poem
September 24, 2020 Fred Shafer - The Experiments the Reader Doesn’t See ( Session 4)
September 24, 2020 Fred Shafer - The Experiments the Reader Doesn’t See (4 Pack)
September 17, 2020 Fred Shafer - The Experiments the Reader Doesn’t See ( Session 3)
September 10, 2020 Fred Shafer - The Experiments the Reader Doesn’t See ( Session 2)
September 03, 2020 Fred Shafer - The Experiments the Reader Doesn’t See ( Session 1)
August 20, 2020 OCWW's Summer Series Program
May 28, 2020 Abby Geni - First Chapter-Remote Session
May 21, 2020 Amy Hassinger - Voice: The Solo Symphony- Remote Session
May 14, 2020 Just Added: Ellen Bass - From Detail to Discovery
May 07, 2020 Joanna Mackenzie/Marcy Posner - Finding Your Agent 101- Remote Session
April 30, 2020 Jane Hertenstein - The Memoir/Fiction Hybrid: Writing that Doesn’t Fit a Category- Remote Session
April 23, 2020 Brian Turner: 10 Tools from the Writer's Rucksack
April 16, 2020 Jennifer Solheim - Sounds and Silences Remote Session
April 02, 2020 Ben Hoffman - Strangeness and Originality -Special Remote Evening Session
March 26, 2020 Mark Belden-Writing From Abundance Remote Session
March 19, 2020 Abby Saul - What You Should Know About Genre and Comparative Titles( Remote Session)
March 12, 2020 Frances de Pontes Peebles - The 23rd Draft: The Art and Logic of Revision
March 05, 2020 Ines Bellina - Social Media for Your Writing Life
February 27, 2020 Rachel Jamison Webster - The Inner Argument
February 20, 2020 John McCarthy - Transcending the Narrative: reimagining how we write emotions in poetry and prose
February 13, 2020 Kate Hannigan - Tapping Your Inner Ten-Year-Old: Writing Fiction and Nonfiction for Young Readers
February 06, 2020 Sophie Lucido Johnson - It's Kind of Funny, Actually: The Basics of Humor Writing
January 30, 2020 Mary Ruth Clarke - The Scene's The Thing: Compelling Scene Workshop and Contest
January 23, 2020 Stuart Dybek- Poetry for Fiction Writers: What Fiction Writers Can Learn from Poems
January 16, 2020 Eric Rampson - Give as Good as You Get: The Workshop Workshop
January 09, 2020 Eileen Favorite - Writing the Novel Synopsis
January 02, 2020 Goldie Goldbloom - The Poetics of Place: Making Landscape Essential to Fiction (rather than a boring digression)
December 19, 2019 Rebecca Makkai - Researching Into the Void
December 12, 2019 David Berner - Don’t Think; Just Write: How to Stop Overanalyzing and Simply Tell a Good Story
December 05, 2019 Patricia McNair - In Love and Kissing in the Dark: A Short Story Workshop
November 21, 2019 Nadine Kenney Johnstone - Write Your Truth
November 14, 2019 Will Boast - Play It Another Way: Experimenting with Tone
November 07, 2019 Zoe Zolbrod - Deeper than the Sum of its Parts -SPECIAL OFF-SITE EVENING SESSION
October 31, 2019 Sara Connell - Every Story is a Ghost Story
October 24, 2019 Vu Tran - What's In a Character
October 17, 2019 Randy Nichols - Find Yourself on the Write Side of the Law
October 10, 2019 Jac Jemc - The Unifying Power of Motif
October 03, 2019 Joe Scapellatto - Prose Poetics: Letting Your Sentences Sing
September 26, 2019 Fred Shafer - The Two Plots - Session 4
September 19, 2019 Fred Shafer - The Two Plots - Session 3
September 12, 2019 Fred Shafer - The Two Plots - Session 2
September 05, 2019 Fred Shafer - The Two Plots - 4 PACK
September 05, 2019 Fred Shafer - The Two Plots - Session 1
May 30, 2019 Abby Geni- Writing a Literary Thriller
May 23, 2019 Matthew Bird- Crafting Compelling Scenes and Meaningful Themes
May 16, 2019 Emily Clark Victorson, Andrea Hall, and Anna Michels- Meet the Editors
May 09, 2019 Michelle Fallkoff-Dialogue Tips for Young Adult and Adult Fiction
May 02, 2019 Sharon Darrow-Emotion and Revision: Finding the "Emotional Core" of Character in Writing for Children and Young Adults.
April 25, 2019 Jennifer Solheim-Want to Improve your Writing? Rx: Read Like a Writer
April 18, 2019 Jay Rehak- Publishing Cohort-Written Fiction: Putting it Together
April 11, 2019 Mary Anne Mohanraj- Writing the Taboo
April 04, 2019 Kelly McNees- Create Conflict that Propels your Plot
March 28, 2019 Eric Rampson-An Arc of Arcs or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Story Structure
March 21, 2019 Abby Saul and Tina Schwartz-The Agent Challenge
March 14, 2019 Joseph Scapellato-Finding Shape and “Stepping Up”: Practical Alternatives to Plotting Fiction
March 07, 2019 Mary Robinette Kowal - Conceptualizing the Modern Short Story
February 28, 2019 Rachel Swearingen - The Magic and Mechanics of Imagery
February 21, 2019 Jay Bonansinga - Storytelling Fundamentals for the Digital Era
February 14, 2019 John S. Green - Book Readings That Sell Your Book
February 07, 2019 Rebecca Makkai - We Need To Talk
January 24, 2019 Stuart Dybek- Closure
January 17, 2019 Richard Thomas - Writing Short Stories: The Art, The Structure, and Why You Should
January 10, 2019 Sara Connell - 21 Ways to Get Published
January 03, 2019 Jay Rehak -Team-Writing an Episodic Novel
December 27, 2018 Rebekah Frumkin - Writing Humor
December 20, 2018 Jane Hertenstein - Holiday Flash
December 13, 2018 Emily Tedrowe– Taking Character Development to the Next Level
December 06, 2018 Mary Ruth Clark - Writing Cinematic Scenes
November 29, 2018 Patricia McNair - Is it Hot in Here or Is It Just My Writing? How to Handle Sex on the Page
November 15, 2018 Steven Trumpeter - Radical Revision
November 08, 2018 Goldie Goldbloom - When All the World Was Green: the Deep Mystery of Gorgeous Fiction
November 01, 2018 Rebecca Johns - Diving Deep into Three Act Structure
October 25, 2018 Vu Tran - What Movies Can Teach Us As Writers
October 18, 2018 Kelly McNees - Muscle Up a Sagging Middle:How to Build and Sustain Page-Turning Momentum
October 11, 2018 Hannah Gamble - Resistance in Writing
October 04, 2018 Amanda Goldblatt - Associative Structures: Making Relationships & Resonance
September 27, 2018 Fred Shafer- The Music of Sentences #4
September 20, 2018 Fred Shafer- The Music of Sentences #3
September 13, 2018 Fred Shafer- The Music of Sentences #2
September 06, 2018 Fred Shafer- The Music of Sentences #1
September 06, 2018 Fred Shafer-The Music of Sentences 4 Pack 2018-2019 Members Only
May 31, 2018 Kelly McNees- Writing Great Endings
May 24, 2018 Keir Graff - Book Reviews and the Library Market
May 17, 2018 David W. Berner — Writing Great Beginnings
May 10, 2018 Sarah Terez Rosenblum - Writing Sex - Off-Site Evening Event
May 03, 2018 Jac Jemc — Haunting as Narrative Driver and Resonance Builder - Evening Event
April 26, 2018 Abby Saul & Tina P. Schwartz - Agent Hunting 101
April 19, 2018 Mary Anne Mohanraj - Writing Complex Identities
April 12, 2018 Barbara Barnett and Richard Davidson - The Path to Publishing Success
April 05, 2018 Amy Hassinger - What is Creative Non-Fiction and Why is it the Next Big Thing in Your Writing Life?
March 29, 2018 Abby Geni - Making Revision Manageable
March 22, 2018 Peter Ferry - Never Give Up: The Writing, Resting, Shopping, Despairing, Evolution and Redemption of a Short Story
March 15, 2018 Matt Bird - Writing for Strangers
March 08, 2018 Susanna Calkins - Bringing in Research While Telling a Compelling Tale
March 01, 2018 Nadine Kenney Johnstone - Make Your Story Meaningful
February 22, 2018 Mary Ruth Clarke-Adapting Fiction for the Performing Arts: Is It a Play? TV Show? Movie?
February 15, 2018 Jay Bonansinga - Writing the Modern Page-Turner
February 08, 2018 Stuart Dybek - Rewriting Is Telling Yourself The Story Again and Again and Again
February 01, 2018 Natasha Tarpley - Writing For and About Children of Color
January 25, 2018 Goldie Goldbloom - Meet Your Conflicts Head On!
January 18, 2018 Hannah Gamble - "Moves" to Spice Up Your Writing: Using the Absurd to Convey Emotional Truths
January 11, 2018 Richard Thomas - What Editors Look for in Short Fiction: Key Elements Paired with Your Unique Voice
January 04, 2018 Amy Jo Cousins - Hot Romance on a Cold Winter Day
December 14, 2017 Jennifer Solheim - Shake Up your Thinking with the Tools of Oulipo: Generate New Work or Reenvision Character, Scene, Plot and More in Works-in Progress
December 07, 2017 Eric Rampson - Go Do The Voodoo That You Do So Well: Finding (and Using) the Fun in Your Writing
November 30, 2017 Zoe Zolbrod - Using Your Personal Life to Enrich Your Writing
November 16, 2017 Kelly McNees - Five Elements Essential to Snagging an Editor's Interest
November 09, 2017 Esther Hershenhorn - Children’s Book Writing Group 101: The WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY AND HOW!
November 02, 2017 Rebecca Johns - Creating Characters- Off-Site Evening Event
October 26, 2017 Christine Sneed - The Writer's Voice
October 19, 2017 Jamie Freveletti - Tips from an International Best-Selling Author
October 12, 2017 Rebecca Makkai - I'm Stuck
October 05, 2017 Lori Rader-Day - Point of View, Your Story's Foundation
September 28, 2017 Fred Shafer 30th Anniversary Celebration Luncheon
September 28, 2017 Fred Shafer - Showing vs Telling Revisited Session 4
September 21, 2017 Fred Shafer - Showing vs Telling Revisited Session 3
September 14, 2017 Fred Shafer - Showing vs Telling Revisited Session 2
September 07, 2017 Fred Shafer - Showing vs Telling Revisited
September 07, 2017 Fred Shafer - Showing vs Telling Revisited Member 4 Pack
May 25, 2017 Rebecca Makkai - Making a Scene
May 18, 2017 Abby Geni - Setting & Description
May 11, 2017 Lori Rader Day - Using Mystery Tools for Any Story
May 04, 2017 Christine Sneed - Breaking Into the Literary Fiction Market
April 27, 2017 Ellen T. McKnight - Best of Both: Plot and Pace with Depth
April 20, 2017 Ellen T. McKnight - Best of Both: Depth and Artistry with Plot
April 13, 2017 Ellen Blum Barish - Identifying Your Writer’s Voice
April 06, 2017 Frances De Pontes Peebles - Keeping The Pace
March 30, 2017 Jamie Freveletti - Writing Action and Conflict
March 23, 2017 Mary Robinette Kowal - The Rest of the Cast
March 16, 2017 Abby Saul - Copy that Sells Your Book
March 09, 2017 Mare Swallow - Building Your Literary Community
March 02, 2017 Zoe Zolbrod - Strategies for Structuring Memoir and Long Narratives
February 23, 2017 Randy Richardson - The Art of Self-Promotion *SPECIAL EVENT*
February 16, 2017 Patricia McNair - The Writer's Road Trip
February 09, 2017 Rachel Harvith - Make Your Dialogue Work
February 02, 2017 Sarah Hammond - The Big Idea
January 26, 2017 Susanna Calkins - Critiquing and Being Critiqued
January 19, 2017 Shawn Shiflett - Building Characters From Real People
January 12, 2017 Christine Maul Rice - How to develop your unique voice on the page
January 05, 2017 Eric Rampson - Creating and Using Humor
December 15, 2016 Richard Thomas - Neo Noir and the Fiction of Darkness
December 08, 2016 Peter Ferry - Character Devolpment
December 01, 2016 Samantha Hoffman - The Art of Revision
November 17, 2016 Christine Sneed - Conflict in Genre v. Literary Fiction
November 10, 2016 Dana Kaye - Launch Your Own Publicity Campaign
November 03, 2016 Jennifer Day - Reading, Writing and the Value of Literary Criticism *SPECIAL EVENT*
October 27, 2016 Rebecca Johns - Structuring Your Novel *Special Event*
October 20, 2016 Jane Hertenstein - Flash Memoir
October 13, 2016 Jennifer Rupp - Book Readings That Sell Your Book
October 06, 2016 Rebecca Makkai - Build It Up
September 29, 2016 9/29 Fred Shafer - The Role of Questions in Fiction Writing
September 22, 2016 9/22 Fred Shafer - The Role of Questions in Fiction Writing
September 15, 2016 9/15 Fred Shafer - The Role of Questions in Fiction Writing
September 08, 2016 Fred Shafer - The Role of Questions in Fiction Writing
August 25, 2016 OCWW Summer Prompt Session
May 26, 2016 Rebecca Makkai — Ending It All
May 19, 2016 David Michael Kaplan — Revising Prose For Power and Punch
May 12, 2016 Stuart Dybek — How To Write Stories That Are Smarter Than You Are
May 05, 2016 James Sherman — Playwrighting
April 28, 2016 Neil Tesser — Seeing The Music
April 21, 2016 Kelly James-Enger—Six-Figure Freelancing
April 14, 2016 Scott Onak — Free Your Writing
April 07, 2016 Ellen T. McKnight—Orchestrating Tension
March 31, 2016 Andy Nathan—Blogging for Your Business
March 24, 2016 Tina Schwartz—Top Five Questions Writers Most Frequently Ask
March 17, 2016 Paul McComas—Stories in the Spotlight
March 10, 2016 Meade Palidofsky — Memoir Theatre
March 03, 2016 Jill Pollack — The Science of Stories
February 25, 2016 Wendy McClure — Craft & Revision
February 18, 2016 Richard Chwedyk—Why Science Fiction Matters
February 11, 2016 Scott Whitehair — Presentation Styles
February 04, 2016 Cheryl Besnjak - Copyright Law
January 28, 2016 Andy Nathan - Internet Marketing
January 14, 2016 Pitch to Your Peers
December 17, 2015 OCWW Holiday Party
December 10, 2015 Esther Hershenhorn: Writing for Children
December 03, 2015 Rick Watkins on Character: The True Essence of Story
November 26, 2015 Thanksgiving
November 19, 2015 Writing the Next Chapter
November 12, 2015 Allie Pleiter: Dynamic Dialogue
November 05, 2015 Jody Nye: Structuring Your Novel
October 29, 2015 Paul McComas: Beginning Hooks
October 22, 2015 Paul McComas: Meaningful Memoir
October 18, 2015 OCWW Meet & Greet

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